NYCBeerWeek2016

NYC Beer Week Has Arrived: Where Should You Go? Does it Really Matter?

NYCBeerWeek2016A few years back, I tried to “do NYC Beer Week” and cover as many of the events as I possibly could. Not only was I utterly exhausted by the end of the week, I came to the conclusion that NYC Beer Week was not the best week of the year to celebrate beer in NYC.

However, a lot of press and time and effort goes in to this annual celebration, so here’s my view on the upcoming “week” (like so many beer weeks, it’s actually 10 days to encompass two weekends): the good, the bad, and the downright ugly.

The Good

  • Keeping it simple with the SimulTap

For the past couple years (since the enactment of the NY State Farm Brewery law), there has been a push for NYC Beer Week brews to be made with local ingredients. Hence, the SMASH beer, which normally stands for Single Malt and Single Hop, but is appropriated for NYC Beer Week as State Malt and State Hop. Brewers challenge themselves to create a simple, state-ingredient beer that can be enjoyed by everyone coming to the city. It’s perfect: No fuss, no frills. And about a dozen bars (including Alewife NYC, Banter, Greenpoint Beer & Ale Co., Jimmy’s No. 43, Murray’s Cheese Bar and Randolph Beer) have agreed to tap and toast a SMASH beer tonight (Friday, February 19th) at 7PM.

Among the breweries that made a 2016 SMASH beer are Big Alice Brewing, Bridge and Tunnel Brewery, Bronx Brewery, Brooklyn Brewery, Coney Island Brewing Company, Finback Brewery, Greenpoint Beer & Ales, Gun Hill Brewing, Heartland Brewing, Keg & Lantern, KelSo Beer, LIC Beer Project, Rockaway Brewing, Sixpoint Brewery, and Transmitter Brewing. It’s a low-key way to kick off the week in style at the location of your choice.

Yes, I do help publicize this event. But it’s also my favorite event not just of Beer Week but of the entire year. In addition to the aforementioned SMASH brewers, Brewer’s Choice invites many brewers from the state and beyond to create unique beers that will be available only for one night. This is not your usual suspects kind of event where everyone is getting—you’ll excuse the pun—smashed. You’ll also get the opportunity to hang out with the brewers themselves. Plus the event offers up about a dozen food purveyors serving everything from tacos to oysters on the half shell, all included in your $80 ticket (and they’re almost sold out so get yours here).

You can double your fun this year by slipping out after 7 PM to KelSo next door and partake of a specialty whiskey tasting from the Caskmates collection: the Jameson Caskmates KelSo Pale Ale Edition. While we’ve all heard about beer being aged in whiskey barrels, this whiskey has actually been aged in a KelSo beer barrel! It’s available in limited quantities, so if you see something, drink something!

  • Final Party is a Cask Festival

Ever since the untimely closing of d.b.a. in Brooklyn, NYC has gone without a proper cask festival. This year’s official closing party resurrects the best way to enjoy beer: gas free and at a proper temperature! Enjoy about 150 casks and light eats, while mingling with the makers. Two sessions will take place on Saturday, February 27th, and there are plenty of tickets (both VIP and GA) remaining for both.

The Bad

  • The opening bash is a cruise

This could go under “The Ugly” as far as I’m concerned. Who thought a booze cruise in February was a good idea? Well, the NYC Brewers Guild actually dodged a major bullet. After record-breaking low temps last Saturday, they’re looking at mid-50s tomorrow, Saturday, February 20th, for their two sailings. And in a surprise to no thinking person, tickets are still available for purchase here. As for me, I’m waiting for the real spring to arrive before heading out to drink in the bay under the Statue of Liberty.

  • Very few truly unique events

In general, there are fewer events being promoted this year and only a handful of them are interesting. Most of the events are just “themes.” A handful of beer dinners. I feel like there’s not a lot of substance or sizzle to the official event listings, but  Shmaltz is premiering their Vulcan Ale as a part of Astronomy Night on the Intrepid this evening (2/19 at 7PM). Bring your favorite Klingon to drink well and prosper. Another event that could be of interest is a Kick-Off Panel  at DBGB’s on Sunday, February 21st from 5-7PM, featuring Garrett Oliver (Brooklyn Brewery), Kelly Taylor (KelSo) and Benjamin Weiss (The Bruery).

The Ugly

  • We’re just not that in to you

In the past couple years, the Brewers Guild has been tweaking how they run and publicize the week, but the growing pains should be in the past. The truth is I hear nothing positive about being a part of NYC Beer Week from the people who really matter: the bar owners and industry insiders who might want to put money into being a sponsor at a Beer Week event. The Guild has decided that NYC Beer Week is really Beer Made by NYC Brewers Week. It’s not about the bar owners or non-guild members. And while this could be a great mission statement, it’s not really flying with anyone. Late last year I heard about a collaboration attempt from the NY State Brewers Association to have an event revolving around “country brewer/city brewer” beers, where upstate breweries would collaborate with city breweries to bring new beers to the market for beer week. That sounded like an awesome idea! But if it happened, no one is publicizing it. I just don’t believe the NYCBG has the bandwidth to undertake a SMASH beer project and a larger collaboration project. The SMASH beers are great, but it’s just a weekend idea. You cannot build 10 days’ worth of programming around this.

How to Right the Ship

  • Move Beer Week back to the fall

Before the NYCBG bought out the original beer week, it was held every September. Bar owners seemed to love it, because that was when business tends to be “off.” We NYers are generally spending the fall outdoors, not in bars. The weather is amazing for a few scant weeks in NYC, and September is one of those months. NYC Beer Week in the fall would encourage people to come indoors, and bar owners would probably drum up some great programming to attract more attendance. In February, business is generally good—random 3-feet blizzards aside—and bars don’t need to allocate resources to come up with clever ideas to attract business. Maybe that’s why this year’s events seem so ho-hum.

  • Incorporate more of the breweries

Nearly all the non-gypsy brewers in the city now have tap rooms. Yet almost no events are planned at any of the tap rooms during NYC Beer Week. Even the aforementioned Jameson event at the KelSo tap room is a whiskey outing. Some breweries (e.g. Bridge and Tunnel) are having ad hoc events as a part of their regular business. It seems like this is a wasted opportunity when places like Other Half routinely have lines around the block trying to get a new beer release. If the NYCBG is about the actual breweries, shouldn’t more events be taking place at the breweries?

  • Hire a few privates

I have long suspected that a major problem with the Guild’s version of NYC Beer Week is “too many generals, not enough privates.” If all you have is everyone looking out for his or her own brand, you’re unlikely to build a beer week of substance. I never hear anyone saying, “Let’s go to NYC for beer week.” Yet, I do hear it about San Francisco, Asheville and—especially here in NYC—Philadelphia. We need to figure out how to make NYC Beer Week “destination worthy,” and then have the troops in line to implement the strategy that the higher-ups devise.

Otherwise, the impetus for getting out to drink over the next 10 days is really just “business as usual.” And no matter the quality of the beer scene, that’s no reason to celebrate our city’s beer culture.

BloodSweatBeer

New Doc Shows Blood, Sweat & Beer of Bringing a Brewery to Life

BrewGentlemenSo, you say you want to open a brewery? A new documentary available online today may make you rethink that plan. Filmmakers Chip Hiden and Alexis Irvin follow four men (three from The Brew Gentlemen Beer Company in Braddock, PA, and one from Shorebilly Brewing Company in Ocean City, MD) as they navigate the hurdles of launching a micro-brewery. Or, more accurately, the perils of being a small business owner in modern-day America.

Blood, Sweat & Beer is the tale of two breweries that begins with the worst of times: Shorebilly Brewing’s owner Danny Robinson is facing financial destitution following what appears to be (and eventually—and subsequent to him changing the brewery name to Backshore Brewing Company—proves to be) a meritless trademark infringement lawsuit from a Tshirt company using the same DBA name. A shortcoming of the film is that we never know for sure if Danny is just a bad businessman (he’s also owner of a nearby restaurant, so I’m assuming not) or just someone caught in the cross hairs of a judicial system that hinders small business growth at every turn. For example, Danny worries that he’ll lose his home and personal property, meaning his business structure is not a corporation, which is pretty much Business 101. It’s hard to be interested in him as a brewer when we only really only see him through the lens of his legal woes.

The more interesting story—and where Blood, Sweat & Beer differentiates itself from documentary predecessors American Beer and Beer Wars—is that of Brew Gentlemen owners Asa Foster and Matt Katase and head brewer Brandon Capps as part of a larger narrative about the demise and rebirth of manufacturing in America. Braddock was a former steel mill town outside of Pittsburgh that never recovered from the bust of the early 1980s. While Pittsburgh proper has come back, Braddock is still trying to figure out its recovery. The documentary then visits similar boom-to-bust-to-beer towns across the country, scoring interviews with brewers and politicians and brewer-politicians (Hello, Colorado Governor and Wynkoop Brewing founder John Hickenlooper) and bolstering with statistics on the tremendous growth in craft brewing. The Braddock brewery is the center of a business resurrection, and the support of the town is paramount to the success of the brewers and their dream of being small business owners in America.

In the end, this film shows just how darn hard it is to open a brewery… and also how incredibly rewarding it is. You really feel the love of the craft beer scene and why so many of us love being a part of it. You root for the up-and-comers and recognize the many faces of established breweries. If you are in the beer scene or just a rabid craft beer drinker, you will definitely see a friendly face or six in Blood, Sweat & Beer. And if you aren’t inspired to launch a business, you may be pulling out your homebrew kit by the end of the 70-minute viewing. Or at least polishing off a few of your favorite beers shown throughout the film.

You’ll be rooting for these little guys to win. And to be able to make more great beer.

Blood, Sweat & Beer is available today in regular or deluxe editions on iTunes and other major online platforms or on DVD via the film’s website.


					
BallastPointCollage

San Diego Send-Off: Smoked Beer Dinner at Ballast Point

ColbyChandlerBPI have a bias to admit: I’m not really big into hype. Whenever I hear about a “must have” beer or brewery, I generally exert too much effort and find myself disappointed in the end product (read: my quest to find Heady Topper). It’s not that the hype isn’t warranted; many times it is. However, by the time I get around to “the real deal,” my expectations are so great that I’m invariably left thinking, “Is that it?”

The opposite can also be true: When I go in with diminished expectations, I can be truly surprised by what I discover.

Among the options on the APlus Limousine tour prior to the San Diego Beer Bloggers Conference were excursions to both Green Flash and Ballast Point. The majority of the group wanted to seek out beers that were not distributed nationally, so both these breweries were left off the pre-excursion itinerary. Thus, when a group of bloggers wanted to visit both these spots after the conference closed, I was happy to tag along.

The big surprise came at Ballast Point. We chose to visit the smaller brewpub in the Little Italy section of San Diego. We were warmly greeted by Tasting Room Manager Amber Crocker, who noted that she was preparing for a beer-pairing dinner later that afternoon. Seeing as I had yet to eat (and already been drinking up at Green Flash), I thought a beer dinner might be a nice change of pace. I asked her the menu: Smoked foods with smoked beers. Not The Bitch’s favorite combo. But when in Rome…

Executive Chef Colin MacLaggan mans the grilling station at the Ballast Point Smoke Beer Dinner on August 24, 2014.

Executive Chef Colin MacLaggan mans the grilling station at the Ballast Point Smoked Beer Dinner on August 24, 2014.

After a brief detour to the Salivador Dali Argillet Collection (which was amazeballs… if you are in San Diego, be sure to check it out at Meyer Fine Art; the installation has been extended through September 27th), I returned to the back patio at Ballast Point, where nine taps were flowing with recommended food pairings from Executive Chef Colin MacLaggan.

It wasn’t long before Ballast Point’s Specialty Brewer Colby Chandler joined me; while the rest of the group was inside the brewpub ordering off the menu, Colby chatted with me about the pairings and then took all of us on an ad hoc tour of the brewery where he poured the Pale Ale Infused with Smoked Serrano Peppers right off the tank. It was so much spicier without the food pairing (see below) and that’s what makes beer such a cool beverage: the fact that food can completely alter its flavor profile.

At $50, the dinner was one hell of a good deal, and the pairings ranged from interesting to intense. And if Amber, Colin and Colby are the status quo for staff service at Ballast Point, the company will continue to expand both in southern California and across the nation (and, yes, the Grapefruit Sculpin on tap is incredible).

The dinner was arranged as a walk-around event with five different stations, so I could start with (and repeat) any course I chose. However, the courses basically went in the following order:

An amuse hors d’oeuvers that was passed around on trays to pair with a can of Even Keel that was handed out at the check-in: A smoked onion, blue cheese tart with mustard seeds reconstituted in the same beer. I think I had five of these, they were so good (and about the dimension of a quarter… hey, I told you I hadn’t eaten all day!).amusetartBP

First course was freshly shucked oysters on the half-shell with a choice of three mignonettes:

  • Smoked shallots in a white balsamic vinaigrette
  • Avocado and cilantro
  • Raspberry

OysterBPHonestly, this was the least appealing of the courses for me, and the beer pairings didn’t really help the cause (somewhat surprisingly, this was also the only station that had a queue, with people coming back for multiple oyster servings). I tried three oysters, one with each mignonette, and paired with the Lung Fish Oak Smoked Helles. I know very little about west coast oysters, but I do know that August is not an ideal month in general for fresh oysters. For whatever reason, the bivalves were incredibly briny and, when combined with two of the three mignonettes (only the avocado/cilantro combination really worked for me), completely overpowered the delicate flavors of the Helles. I went back for a fourth oyster (avocado mignonette) to pair with the San Salvador Oyster Shwarzbier with Herbs, and this was a much better pairing, although the brine of the oyster was still very much the dominant flavor.

The second course (which I had fourth) was a perfect pairing: Chilled Cucumber Gazpacho with Smoked Foam paired with the aforementioned Ballast Point Pale Ale Infused with Smoked Serrano Peppers. This beer was hot hot hot… but I had no idea until I drank it a second time straight from the tank without the gazpacho. The cucumber completely neutralized the spiciness without diminishing the flavor of the beer. A+ to Colin and Colby on this combo.gazpachoBP

The third course was a revelation: Grilled Spanish Octopus with mushrooms, cherry tomato, Shishito pepper in a Banyals vinaigrette over garlic puree. This was paired with the Smokescreen Beachwood Smoked Helles. On its surface (and maybe this is where expectation really comes in to play), I should have hated this pairing. I mean, I am no fan of octopus, finding it too chewy and just damn weird to look at . And the Smokescreen was the closest thing to a rauchbier I drank all night (not a beer I ever enjoy). However, the chef treated the octopus for 48 hours before cooking it over an open flame. The result was a lobster-esque tenderness (Colby likened it to string cheese), and the earthiness of the mushrooms plus the smokiness of the Shishitos brought out so many subtle flavors that this was genuinely a gourmand’s dream come true. And the beer was perfect. Best in show for this pairing. I had two servings, I liked it that much.octopusBP

Another course being served by Chef Colin at the same grilling station was a Smoked Pork Rib served with a “Carolina style” smoked beer BBQ Sauce over honey slaw and cornbread crostini. Paired with Abandon Ship Beechwood Smoked Marzen, this pairing brought out both the salty and spicy notes, although I didn’t detect much Carolina in the sauce (that would be mustard based, I assume?). Either way, another excellent match between beer and food.smokedribBP

Finally, dessert was served with a trio of beers:

  • Sour Wench with Raspberries (too soda pop for my taste)
  • 2012 Sour Wench with Marion Blackberries (much nicer version of the Sour Wench)
  • 2011 Boob Check (the cancer awareness collaboration beer they made with White Labs)

dessert_BPThese were paired with a baked “crispy” shortbread over which was poured fresh berries and smoked rose petal curd, topped with a dollop of rosemary cream. The outside of the shortbread had been coated in sugar, and the rosemary cream was a delightful addition, particularly to someone like myself who doesn’t particularly care for sweet desserts.

There was a tenth beer that was supposedly available—the 2010 Three Sheets Barleywine—that I didn’t try to track down, so I don’t know how it tasted. By that point I was with Colby checking out the brewery, and I’d had quite my fill of great food and optimal beer pairings that this dinner offered. I liked this smoked-smoked idea so much that I recommended it to my NYC client, and he’s going to be hosting a smoked beer with food pairings dinner next month.

To see all my San Diego pictures, including more from Ballast Point, please visit (and like) my Facebook page.

 

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NYC Beer Week Wrap-Up Part 1

BeerWeekGrainsThrough a haze of amazing beer, people and NYC Beer Week events, I have emerged. While I didn’t go out every day this week, I did hit up several new venues and came to even more conclusions about what this “annual celebration” means for this city (more on that in Part 2, to follow). Rather than attempt to marry my activities to my thoughts, I’ve decided to sum up with a grade-school-style essay that might as well be called, “How I spent my Beer Week.”

Day 1 – Friday, February 21st

I guess I could say I’m getting too old to go out every night, but I think I’m just too lazy to go out every night. Not to mention the whole “beer makes you fat” thing (and to those opponents of this notion, I always joke, “Sure, beer doesn’t make you fat… but calories do!”). Anyhow, I had an awesome time hanging out at 508 Gastrobrewery with Brooklyn Brew Shop the night before, so I opted to lay low and hang with a friend at Williams & Bailey for East Williamsburg Restaurant Week (yes, there is such a thing, and it’s way cheaper than NYC Restaurant Week).

Day 2 – Saturday, February 22nd

I really hope that Clinton Hall finds its identity. I feel like it’s going through growing pains. On a positive note, the beer garden built from the ashes (or perhaps, more accurately, soggy mush) of Merchants NY Café still brings in an upscale FiDi crowd that would pay $8 for a Stella, so they’re really not gonna blink when they shell out $10 for Perennial’s La Boheme (Clinton Hall had the only keg of Jonathan Moxey’s wild sour in NYC). But does this crowd appreciate the delicacy of a flux capacitor (one of only two in NYC—the other at Tørst) or the fact that the bar is run by a Certified Cicerone (do these bridge and tunnel types even know what a Cicerone is)? I’ve met Abraham Merchant and he’s not one to fail; each of his Lower Manhattan restaurants has its unique style. That said, this bar is a cut above the neighborhood (and The Bitch lived there before she was Brooklyn-bound, so I know of what I speak!). I love hanging out there on a Sunday in the early evening, when there’s no one at the bar. But that’s kinda a problem, i.e. no one at the bar. A bar this good (and this pricey) will need the love of the NYC craft beer community if it is to succeed as an artisanal joint rather than just an excuse not to go to TGI Fridays one block east.

Day 3 – Sunday, February 25th

Since the only event I really wanted to attend was Caskalot but couldn’t bring myself to schlep back into Manhattan, I took a day off from drinking (shock!)

Day 4-5 – Monday-Tuesday, February 24th-25th

Honestly, I had no idea just how hard publicizing NYC Beer Week would be! On top of my own (gratis) calendar and Best Bets, I was doing last minute-outreach for NYC Brewer’s Choice. So, while I did drink some growlers, mostly I was working my ass off on these days.

Day 6 – Wednesday, February 26th

BrewersChoiceOkay, I have to admit there’s something not quite right about the state of beer drinkers in NYC. They’ll pay a small fortune to line up to be part of a clusterfuck at a warehouse-packed tasting event, but then won’t spring for what was arguably the best beer event of the week. Yes, I’m paid to promote NYC Brewer’s Choice. Yes, I know there are certain behind-the-scenes issues. That said, this year’s event blew it out of the water! The amazing food (from Luke’s Lobster, Reynard, Nordic Breads and Blue Island Oyster Co., among others) was paired with several dozen different brews made with local ingredients. Plus, beers were poured by the brewers themselves! Maybe it was because people didn’t want to schlep to the Wythe Hotel or maybe it’s just because NYC is still in its pubescent “let’s get wasted” phase, but I’ll never understand why the more interesting and sophisticated drinking+eating events don’t sell out. I said the same thing last year when Savor came to town: NYC has a long way to go with regards to beer appreciation, and I fear that NYC Beer Week is not doing anything to advance quality (of both beer and programming) in this regard.

Day 7 – Thursday, February 27th

Was heading to Spuyten Duyvil for Two Roads when I passed my favorite growler shop… pouring Two Roads. I stayed in and watched Elementary.

Day 8 – Friday, February 28th

Kristen_SonyaOkay okay… I admit that I’m not a fan of the bus system in NYC. However, after I discovered the B48 (which I rode two days in a row), I will have to rethink my loathe of traveling to South Brooklyn. I didn’t know what to expect (from both the transit option and the bar) when I headed out to Glorietta Baldy for their Women+Beer First “event.” Turns out, it was more like a theme, with $1 off draughts, homebrew, and some amazingly cool women hanging out. I grabbed a seat at the bar, only to discover with great luck that I was sitting beside Allagash’s NYC rep, Kristen Demergian. I pretty much put shit out there (as anyone who knows me will testify), and it’s no bullshit when I say how much I love Allagash. As luck would have it, Kristen had something up her sleeve (okay, it was in her bag): an unlabeled bottle of the new year-round beer (their first since 2007), Allagash Saison. I haven’t sampled it yet, but it will be available on the market March 21st, just in time for spring!

After Kristen headed out for another event, I ended up talking to the So half of KelSo: Sonya Giacobbe was in the house, and even offered to save me from the bus ride home with a lift back to North Brooklyn (but I was able to find my way to the northbound B48 despite her kind offer). And the Internet is a strange thing: I’ve “known” Beerded Lady Hayley Karl, but this was the first time we’d met up face-to-face.

An awesomesauce time was had by all, I think (and I heard after 10 you really couldn’t get in the place, so I guess I left just at the right time).

Day 9 – Saturday, March 1st

Yesterday, I wrote all about this. Without a doubt, Saturday’s outing was one of those “I’ll never forget…” experiences. The lagering caves of Brooklyn tour led by Josh Bernstein was not just a geek out moment for beer lovers, but a truly historical tour that harkened back to a simpler time. Of course, no cell service in the caves punctuated that.

Afterwards, I headed out with Good Beer’s Matt Cincotta to Fourth Avenue Pub, where I drank some of the same Peekskill brews that were being poured from the tanks when I visited the brewery in January.

Day 10 – Sunday, March 2nd

Went out for Bloody Marys early, came home, took a nap, stayed up too late watching the least interesting (and most predictable) Oscars ever. But at least Ellen didn’t drive me to drink.

Cheers to another NYC Beer Week that came to a close just in time for March Madness!

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Where are the geekiest outings for NYC Beer Week?

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 presetSo, tomorrow marks the start of NYC Beer Week. Earlier today, I was at 508 Gastrobrewery talking with Chris Cuzme about the state of beer in NYC while drinking the new Coffee & Donut Stout, a yummy 6.7% ABV collaboration brew that launches EST Beer, a new commercial brewing company from the co-founders of Brooklyn Brew Shop.

When surrounded by knowledgeable beer folk, it’s easy to forget that there are many in the NYC Beer Community that want NYC Beer Week to cater to the wine and whiskey crowd, as I like to call them, people who are either new to craft beer or are not the typical beer drinkers. And there are a lot of tastings and tap takeovers throughout the city that should be enjoyed by novice beer drinkers.

But with so many events on the calendar for the coming 10 days, which ones have a geek factor that savvy beer drinkers won’t want to miss? Here are my favorites (and be sure to check out my beer calendar here), listed in order, so you can serve yourself up with a non-stop barrage of the best beers NYC Beer Week has to offer:

Saturday the 22nd –

Start things off early (they open at noon) at Spuyten Duyvil’s Big Woody 2014, where you can grab a couple big beers and wood-aged beers before sobering up and heading into Manhattan for New & Rare Beer Night: Wild, Barrel-Aged, & Rare Beers with Jonathan Moxey at Clinton Hall. This is an awesome chance to purchase some killer brews (you must RSVP for free, pay-as-you-go at event from 7-10:30 p.m.), including La Boheme, a wild sour beer brewed with Brett and Lacto yeasts, aged in red wine barrels for 2 years, and steeped in Michigan tart cherries for 6 months. They’ve got the only keg in NYC!
Other beers include Perennial Trixie, Heart of Gold, Sum Imperial Coffee Stout, among others.

Sunday the 23rd –

Cuzme says the early session of CASKALOT: A Festive Celebration of NYC Cask Conditioned Ales at 508 Gastrobrewery is pretty much sold out. So sleep in and wander out in the evening for the session from 6-9 p.m.  $45 ticket here. Includes three hours of unlimited pours of cask conditioned ales by NYC Brewers Guild Brewers.

Monday the 24th –

Head to the West Villiage for Murray’s Cheese Bar Annual Beer Dinner with Jeff O’Neil. Murray’s Cheese Bar Annual Beer Dinner featuring one our favorite local brewers: Peekskill Brewery. 5 courses of cheese-centric dishes; each perfectly paired with a Peekskill brew and will include some amazing rarities that never make it to NYC. 2 seatings: 5:30pm & 8:30pm. $65 tickets here.

Tuesday the 25th –

Dogfish Head Tap Take-Over at The Pony Bar (UES) With Head Brewer Tim Hawn. Meet the brewer with 20 lines and a cask of all your favorite Dogfish Head, vintage selections, and rarely seen specialties.

Wednesday the 26th –

NYC Brewer’s Choice at the Wythe Hotel. From 6-9:30, brewers serving their own beer from nearly 30 breweries, including locally sourced grains in the following beers:

  • Captain Lawrence will pour Cream of the Crop – a Cream Ale brewed with NY 6 row barley and corn from Valley Malt.
  • Blind Bat Brewing is bringing Hell Gate Golden Ale, which incorporates Valley Malt barley grown by O’Mara’s Farm in Canastota, NY, and with coriander grown in Centerport Long Island at Seed Sower Farm; plus they’ll have Long Island Potato Stout – a Dry Irish Stout brewed with organic potatoes grown by Fred Lee of Sang Lee Farms in Peconic, NY.
  • Queens’ brewery Big Alice will pour Coffee Belgium White Stout and Spiced Honey Smoked Ale – both with Valley Malt grains.
  • Empire Brewing is bringing Wheat Wine Red Winter with wheat from Valley Malt, 2 row from Farmhouse Malting NYC, and Cascade Hops from Hop Farm NY.
  • Crossroads has Midnight RYEder – a Black Rye IPA brewed with 6 row barley and Danko Rye from Valley Malt.
  • Sixpoint Craft Ales will bring a special batch of Sweet Action made using 100% NY State ingredients.
  • Greenport Harbor is bringing Cali Common made with Valley Malt grains and Cuvaison – a Belgian strong using merlot grapes from NY State Winery of the Year and Greenport’s neighbor in Cutchogue, McCall’s Vineyard.
  • Peekskill has “Aristocrats” – Sour Ale made with 100% NY State ingredients, NY Pale Ale.
  • White Birch  will pour Rye Brown Ale.

Tickets here.

Thursday the 27th –

From noon on, hop the path to Jersey City for “Bridge & Tunnel” Night at Barcade. Consider this is great counter programming to NYC Beer Week in that they are featuring beers from craft breweries not available in New York. Beers include:

  • B. Nektar Zombie Killer – 7.0% ABV – Cherry Cyser
  • Boaks Abbey Brown Ale – 7.0% – Big Belgian Brown Ale
  • Bolero Snort Lucky Buck – 4.0% – Irish Stout on Nitro
  • Epic Brainless on Peaches – 10.5% – Belgian style Strong Pale Ale aged in French Chardonnay barrels and blended with organic peach puree
  • Great Lakes Conways Irish Ale – 6.5% – Irish Ale
  • Kane Head High – 6.5% – American style India Pale Ale
  • Kane Simplicity – 8.7% – Belgian style Golden Strong Ale
  • Lancaster Gold Star Pilsner – 5.5% – Czech style Pilsner
  • Lost Abbey Deliverance – 12.5% – A blend of bourbon barrel aged Serpent’s Stout and brandy barrel aged Angel’s Share.
  • Neshaminy Creek Imperial Chocolate Mudbank – 8.5% – Imperial Milk Stout brewed with semi-sweet Belgian chocolate
  • NJ Beer Co. Wee Heavy – 8.3% – Scotch Ale
  • Port Mongo – 8.5% – Imperial India Pale Ale
  • Saucony Creek Lord of Misrule – 9.5% – Belgian style Strong Dark Ale
  • Terrapin “Cinnamon Roll’d” Wake-n-Bake – 9.4% – Imperial Oatmeal Stout brewed with coffee and cinnamon
  • Thomas Creek Coffee Oatmeal Stout – 8.0% – Oatmeal Stout brewed with coffee
  • Yards “Corsica” Love Stout – 5.0% – Stout brewed with whole fresh oysters and cold press Corsica coffee from La Colombe.

And on the way back, get your chocolate fix at ChocoBrewvana: The Chocolicious Beer Dinner at 508 Gastrobrewery. Cuzme pairs beers to a chocolate-themed dinner co-hosted by Clay Gordon, chocolate critic and founder of The Chocolate Life. Chocolate will be included as an integral component of every course, and each will be paired with a specific house made craft beer. This is a dinner unlike any other and is not to be missed. Ticket ($80 here) includes 6 courses and 6 beers. From 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Friday the 28th –

This could be a his-hers night, or you can start out at New York Beer Company for the 2nd Annual New York State Brewers Convention with Blue Point, Bronx Brewery, Ommegang, Kelso and others starting at 5 p.m. and then head over to Glorietta Baldy in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights area for Women & Beer First from 7p.m. There will be specials lady-brewed beers with the brewers, homebrewers, and industry professionals representing some of the most popular craft breweries worldwide.

Saturday the 1st –

You’re in the homestretch, so might as well head over to one of the two Saturday sessions at the NYC Craft Beer Festival – Spring Seasonal event at the Lexington Armory. Go forth and drink from more than 150 craft beer offerings. Although if you want food and to avoid the crowds, go ahead and spring for the $125 VIP Connoisseur Lounge, where the lines are typically quite short and the chefs top-drawer. Tickets here.

Sunday the 2nd –

Pre-game your Oscar party over at Mug’s Alehouse in Williamsburg at Split Thy Skull XV. All day Sunday, its big beers like tone Matt’s Burning Rosids Imperial Cherrywood Smoked Saison.